Does recycling go to landfill?

    NO! After collection, recycling is transported and processed at the ReGroup Materials Recovery Facility (MRF) in Hume, ACT and does NOT go to landfill. 

    What happens after the recycling is processed?

    What happens after the recycling is processed?

    ·  Paper & Cardboard - All fibre products are transported to the Visy paper mill in Tumut for processing into recycled product

    ·  Glass is converted into sand, which is used in local civil markets for a variety of purposes including road base

    ·  PET Plastic (e.g. soft drink bottles) usually transported to Sydney for remanufacture

    ·  HDPE Plastic (e.g. milk bottles) usually is sent to Narrabri for remanufacturing

    ·  Mixed Plastic is traditionally sold as feedstock to international markets

    ·  Aluminium is usually sent to an aluminium smelter in QLD

    ·  Steel is traditionally sold as feedstock to international markets

    ·  Contaminated recycling is separated from recycling at the MRF and disposed of at the Mugga Lane landfill

    Please visit Council’s website for more information.

    Why is my red lidded bin small?

    You can reduce the amount of waste in your red lidded landfill bin by following the 5 R’s of zero waste. Refuse, Reduce, Reuse, Recycle and Rot.

    Some helpful hints may include.

    Refuse purchase only what you need. Additionally you could refuse single use items that you don’t need such as plastic bags, straws and fresh produce wrapped in plastic.

    Reduce the amount of waste you produce, choose products with less packaging and/or buy in bulk where possible. Buy products that will last a lifetime. Grow your own food.

    Reuse items you already have of buying new or using single-use products. Use a reusable coffee cup or straw. Choose rechargeable batteries instead of single-use and try using reusable cloths instead of paper towels.

    Recycle all items that you cannot reuse instead of sending them to in landfill. This includes using Community Recycling Centers and recycling facilities that accept those hard to recycle items which cannot be recycled as part your kerbside collection service, such as fluorescent tubes, batteries, electronics and soft plastics.

    Rot by composting your organic material at home or using your lime green lidded food and garden organics bin where applicable. 

    I’m not in an area that has a lime green lidded food and garden organics (FOGO) bin, when will I get a FOGO bin?

    Council is currently in the process of upgrading our composting facility to allow for an increased volume of production. This upgrade will need to be completed before we can expand our FOGO services to other areas of the region.

    In 2019 Council undertook an analysis of the composting operations. This identified that the facility was not able to accept the extra volume of material that an expansion of FOGO bins would produce. The design and planning approval for the upgrade to the facility is underway and will take a minimum of two years for a facility of this size and nature.

    Should I follow the recycling sticker on my yellow lidded bin?

    No! What can be recycled in your yellow lidded recycling bin can sometimes change due to what the materials recovery facility can receive. The sticker on your yellow lidded recycling bin may not have the most up to date recycling information. The best source of information for what can be recycled is recent information supplied by Council. Please visit Council’s website for what can be placed in your yellow lidded recycling bin.

    Should I follow the triangle “recycling” symbols on plastic packaging?

    No! The triangle “recycling” symbol on plastic packaging is NOT a recycling symbol. This triangle is a plastic identification symbol which identifies the type of plastic a product is made from. Council yellow lidded recycling bins can only accept plastic types 1, 2, 3 and 5. Please visit here for more information. 

    Can I follow the Australasian Recycling Label?

    Yes! The new Australasian Recycling Label can be referred to for correct recycling information. The Australasian Recycling Label is a label which shows what can be done with each piece of a package to dispose of it in the best way.

    Please visit Council’s website for more information on the Australasian Recycling Label. 

    Why can’t I place recyclable items in a bag or box?

    Recycling placed inside plastic bags or boxes goes as waste to landfill as contamination. The sorting process at the materials recycling facility means that staff are unable to open bags for safety reasons and so bagged material gets removed from the conveyor belt as contamination. 

    Keeping items loose ensures that the material can be sorted properly.


    Why do I have to wash containers? Won’t rinsing waste water?

    Keeping recyclables clean is important to ensuring they can be processed effectively and are able to be sold in competitive markets. We need people to wipe, scrape or rinse out food and drink containers before placing containers in the recycling bin.

    Rinsing containers under a running tap can waste water, so it is recommended that you add the empty containers to your daily dish washing pile, they can be cleaned with the water you are already using.

    Will you consider waste to energy (WTE) or alternative waste treatment (AWT) facilities as part of the waste strategy?

    No. Council has previously considered the potential feasibility of these waste management options in our local government area. Both of these waste management options were deemed not suitable for Council due to scale and economic and feasibility.

    Is recycling the end goal?

    Council also encourages the reduction of all waste streams. This includes recycling.

    Does recycling collected in the Snowy Monaro go to landfill?

    No! After collection, recycling is transported to the ReGroup Materials Recovery Facility (MRF) in Hume, ACT for processing and does NOT go to landfill. For more information visit Where does my Recycling Go? https://www.snowymonaro.nsw.gov.au/1330/Where-does-my-Recycling-Go 

    Around 90-95% of materials processed through the ACT MRF (paper, cardboard, glass, steel and aluminium) are sold to domestic markets. Paper and cardboard, which makes up around 45-55% of the material (by weight) are sent to a pulp and paper mill in Tumut NSW to produce recycled paper products.  Glass, which makes up around 30-35% of the material processed is ground into sand and sold locally and interstate.  Other materials such as (HDPE and PET plastics, aluminium and steel), are sold to a variety of end-users based on market demand. 

    For more info see: https://www.cityservices.act.gov.au/recyclopaedia/canberras-recycling-story 

    I’m not in an area that has a lime green lidded food and garden organics (FOGO) bin, when will I get a FOGO bin?

    Council is committed to expanding this service to other townships, however, the composting facility at the Cooma Landfill site must undergo upgrading to allow for an increase in production. Council is currently preparing an Environmental Impact Statement that will be submitted as part of the approval process and the design and planning approval for the upgrade to compost facility is underway. 

    Should I follow the recycling information found on:

    a. My yellow lidded bin?

    No! A lot of the bins are older and information on lids has changed. The best source of information for what can be recycled can be found in educational material supplied by Council (e.g. Council’s Resource and Waste collections calendar). 

    Please visit Council’s website What Can I Recycle or contact our Resource and Waste Education Department on 1300 345 345 to learn about what can be placed in your yellow lidded recycling bin.https://www.snowymonaro.nsw.gov.au/288/What-Can-I-Recycle


    b. The triangle “recycling” symbols on plastic packaging? 

    No! The triangle “recycling” symbol on plastic packaging is NOT a recycling symbol, the triangle is a plastic identification symbol which identifies the type of plastic a product is made from. 

    Councils yellow lidded recycling bins can currently only accept household packaging plastic-type numbers 1, 2, 3 and 5. Please visit What Can I Recycle for more information. 

    https://www.snowymonaro.nsw.gov.au/288/What-Can-I-Recycle


    c. The Australasian Recycling Label?
     Yes!
     The new Australasian Recycling Label can be referred to for correct recycling information. The Australasian Recycling Label shows what can be done with each piece of packaging so that it can be disposed of most appropriately.

    Please visit Council’s website Australasian Recycling Label for more information. https://www.snowymonaro.nsw.gov.au/1410/Australasian-Recycling-Label 


    d. Should I dispose of batteries in my red bin?

    No! Batteries should be disposed of correctly for FREE at Council offices or waste facilities to allow them to be recycled. Batteries contain vital resources and should be recycled. Batteries disposed of in landfill have the potential to start fires when compaction occurs.

    Has Council considered waste to energy (WTE) or alternative waste treatment (AWT) facilities as part of the waste strategy?

    Council has previously considered the potential feasibility of these waste management options in our local government area. Both of these waste management options were deemed unsuitable for Council due to scale and economic feasibility.

    Is recycling the end goal?

    Council encourages the reduction of all waste streams and diversion from landfill. This includes recycling. 


    You can reduce the amount of waste going to landfill by following the 5 Rs of zero waste. Refuse, Reduce, Reuse, Recycle and Rot.

    Refuse purchase only what you need. Additionally, you could refuse single-use items that you don’t need such as plastic bags, straws and fresh produce wrapped in plastic.

    Reduce the amount of waste you produce, choose products with less packaging and/or buy in bulk where possible. Buy products that will last a lifetime. Grow your food at home.

    Reuse items you already have by buying new or using single-use products. Use a reusable coffee cup or straw. Choose rechargeable batteries instead of single-use and try using reusable cloths instead of paper towel.

    Recycle all items that you cannot reuse instead of sending them to landfill. This includes using Community Recycling Centres and recycling facilities that accept those hard to recycle items which cannot be recycled as part your kerbside collection service, such as fluorescent tubes, batteries, electronics and soft plastics.

    Rot by composting your organic material at home or using your lime green lidded food and garden organics bin where applicable. 

    Why wasn’t my bin collected?

    The collection routes are scheduled on days, not times as the collection vehicles may drive past your property very early in the morning. Your bins need to be presented kerbside/roadside the night before collection.

    Make sure bins are placed on the kerb with Council logo facing the road and wheels/handle towards the house. Keep bins 1 metre apart from each other and away from objects such as letterboxes, trees and parked cars.

    Heavily compacted waste can sometimes get stuck in your bin, ensure your waste and recycling will easily dislodge from your bin.



    When are my bins collected?

    A hard copy of the Resource and Waste calendar can be collected from all Council offices and waste facilities or you can download a copy from Council website, here

    Calendars can also be mailed out upon request. 

    * Waste is collected weekly. 

    * Recycling is collected fortnightly.

    * Food and Garden Organics is collected fortnightly (Cooma township only) 

    https://www.snowymonaro.nsw.gov.au/1326/Bin-Collection-Calendar

    Should I take my bins with me when I sell my house or move?

    No. All council issued bins remain the property of Council and are registered to a specific address and must remain at the property. Please do not relocate your bin. 

    There are no bins at my property. How can I get bins or receive a collection service?

    If you are renting, contact your real estate agent who will arrange bins for you.

    If you own the property, please call Council’s Resource and Waste Department on 1300 345 345 or email council@snowymonaro.nsw.gov.au to check your property status and organise a service. 


    In the case of a new build, you will need to provide an Occupancy Certificate for your property. This certificate is required by Council before the delivery of a new collection service.

    My bins are missing?

    To reduce the risk of your bins going missing, please ensure you present them on the kerb no earlier than the night before your collection day, and bring them in the same day after they have been emptied. If your bin/s are missing, please contact the Resource and Waste Department on 1300 345 345 for assistance. Bins that are not found or have been damaged, will be required to be replaced at the cost to the property owner.  

    My collection day falls on a public holiday. Will my bin be collected?

    Yes. There are no changes to bin collections on public holidays, except for Christmas day. If there are any changes to the collection days in your area alternative collections days will be advised at the earliest opportunity.

    How do I dispose of paint, batteries, fluorescent globes, gas bottles, fire extinguishers, cooking and other oils?

    You can drop off your unwanted paint or other household problem waste items FREE of charge at Council's Community Recycling Centres at either the Cooma or Jindabyne landfills. For more information, https://www.snowymonaro.nsw.gov.au/917/Community-Recycling-Centres

    or contact 1300 345 345. 

    Keep your eye out for Council’s Mobile Community Recycling Centre, which will be rotating between regional transfer stations. Please do not dispose of these items in your kerbside waste, recycling or organic bins.

    How do I dispose of my green waste?

    Cooma residents have a Food Organics and Garden Organics Kerbside Collection - which is collected fortnightly.

    All other areas can dispose of small amounts in your red lidded waste bin with your general household rubbish, larger amounts can drop off at your nearest waste facility. 

    Fees and charges for green waste disposal will be applied in accordance with Council’s Schedule of Fees and Charges.

    Why doesn’t council do bulky waste collection?

    Bulky waste collections are under consideration in Council’s Resource and Waste Management Strategy which will be published later in 2020. For more information see https://yoursaysnowymonaro.com.au/inform-councils-resource-and-waste-management-strategy 

    How can I report illegal dumping?

    If you spot illegal dumping in NSW such as; used household items, old tyres, green waste or construction waste e.g. bricks and timber, you can report it online

    https://ridonline.epa.nsw.gov.au/#/home or contact Council on 1300 345 345. 

    If there is an immediate environmental emergency such as toxic fumes or a large chemical spill, call 000 immediately. 

General

    I took part in the community survey conducted in 2020, did anyone listen to feedback?

    Yes, thank you for your feedback. The community survey was an invaluable tool in developing this strategy. The survey enabled us to identify the challenges and key issues and develop solutions to address them.

    Who assisted Council in the development of this strategy?

    We worked with MRA Consulting Group – one of Australia’s leading environmental consultancy firms, specialising in all aspects of waste and recycling. They have worked with many Councils across Australia. See www.mraconsulting.com.au

    When is this all going to happen?

    There are many elements to this strategy that will be implemented over the next 10 years. The plan is for a large amount of the elements to be rolled out over the next 2-3 years.

    Why do any changes need to be made?

    There were a number of factors that lead to this strategy being developed:

    • Waste management practices are changing and we need to ensure that we are not just keeping up with contemporary practices – but also planning for the future.
    • Some of Council’s waste operations are running at a loss or could be operating more efficiently – we need to find solutions that reduce both our costs and our environmental impact while still maintaining a high level of service to the community.

    Will there be any job losses?

    No, this strategy will not result in any job losses. Some jobs may change, but it is likely that there will be an increase in jobs as a result of the strategy. For instance, we will be requiring more collection staff when we roll out FOGO and expansion in kerbside services.

    What is happening with fees and charges?

    Fees and charges are currently being reviewed. We will share this information once it is confirmed.

    What are my waste charges and what do they cover?

    Waste Management Charge applies to all rateable properties within the Snowy Monaro region. The charge assists Council in meeting the costs of providing waste transfer station facilities to the community, providing community waste education, household chemical collection days, operating the community recycling centres (including the mobile CRC), the cost of rehabilitating landfill legacy sites, providing waste disposal services to rural communities, clean up of illegal dumping activities and servicing of street litter bins.  These are elements of the services which the waste management department provides to all members of the community.


    Domestic Waste Collection Charges includes the collection, transport and disposal of waste.


    Domestic Recycling Collection Charges includes the collection, transport to and processing fees at the materials recovery facility. 


    Bank of Bins is an opt-in application only service available for residents who would prefer the benefits of dropping their domestic waste and recycling at a designated area instead of driving it to a waste facility.


    Landfill and Transfer Stations charge on a user pays principle. Charges are based on handling, processing, transport, disposal, and aftercare costs of these waste streams.

    How can I provide feedback?

    Community members can provide feedback via the Your Say page (insert link), by sending a letter to Council or emailing council@snowymonaro.nsw.gov.au.

    Come to one of the community consultation sessions (insert link here) or call 1300 345 345 if you have further questions. Feedback will only be considered if it is sent to Council in writing by one of the three methods mentioned above.

Closure of Transfer Stations

    Which Transfer Stations are closing?

    There are six transfer stations that will transition to closing – they are Adaminaby, Berridale, Bredbo, Delegate, Nimmitabel and Numeralla. 

    However, we are replacing these services with an expansion of kerbside and/or bank of bins services. Both of these services will be implemented and fully operational before any closures take place.

    An expansion of kerbside and/or bank of bins services was requested by many of the rural residents that completed the survey.

    My local transfer station is closing – where do I go now?

    We are introducing more kerbside collections to our villages – and there is the option of Bank of Bins for rural residents (i.e. outside of the villages). As we will be expanding these services the need for residents to regularly visit a waste facility should decrease.

    Otherwise:

    • Adaminaby residents can visit our Cooma facility
    • Berridale residents can visit either our Cooma or Jindabyne facilities
    • Bredbo residents can visit our Cooma facility
    • Delegate residents can visit our Bombala facility
    • Nimmitabel residents can visit either our Cooma or Bombala facilities
    • Numeralla residents can visit our Cooma facility 

Change of Jindabyne and Bombala Landfills to Transfer Stations

    I’m a resident in Bombala or Jindabyne – what does this mean for you?

    As a user of these facilities, there will be no reduction in services. You will still be able to drop off your waste items – they will simply then be transferred to Cooma Landfill. Asbestos and contaminated soil will be required to be directly transported to the Cooma facility for disposal as these wastes require strict disposal measures to enable our staff to safely dispose of this material.

    Why are you changing Jindabyne Landfill to a Transfer Station?

    Jindabyne Landfill is getting very close to being full and will have had to close within three years. We have investigated expanding the landfill, which provides no benefit over converting the site into a transfer station. Council aims to reduce its reliance on landfills and we feel developing a new landfill goes against the core vision and themes of the strategy.

    Why are you changing Bombala Landfill to a Transfer Station?

    This decision has been driven by cost-saving and environmental impacts. Council aims to reduce its reliance on landfills and we feel operating multiple landfills goes against the core vision and themes of the strategy.

    Doesn’t this just increase the carbon footprint?

    Considerable analysis – including carbon footprint modelling - has been undertaken in making this decision. While there will be an increase in truck movements the improvement to landfill operations will significantly lower Council’s greenhouse gas emissions.

New kerbside collections and Bank of Bins expansion

    Which areas are getting kerbside collection?

    Kerbside collection will be coordinated for all village areas throughout the region. The expansion of these routes to residents is proposed in the strategy.

    Do I have to get kerbside collection?

    If you live within a village area then kerbside collection will be mandatory. Outside of the villages, this service will likely be opt-in.

    I’m outside of a village – how do I apply for Bank of Bins access?

    Bank of Bins can be set up in a rural area where there is a minimum of six households wishing to participate. If you already live close to a Bank of Bins please contact Council.

    This is going to increase my fees substantially?

    Residents that currently use Landfill/Transfer stations are likely paying approximately $240 a year, if they are diligent in their waste minimisation practices. 

    Kerbside collection costs approximately $380 (Waste & recycling) a year and approximately $250 a year for Bank of Bins.


Food and Garden Organics (FOGO)

    Which areas are getting FOGO?

    The main village areas throughout the region (i.e. those receiving kerbside collection) will receive a FOGO (green lidded) bin in the rollout. Residents outside of the villages will be able to opt-in if they receive a collection and there is enough demand for this service.

    When will this be rolled out?

    The timings of the rollout are still being worked out, however, it will be within the next 2-3 years.

    Why has it taken so long to get FOGO outside of Cooma?

    We needed to ensure that we have sufficient facilities in place to process collections.

Bulky Waste

    Will bulky waste collection be available for everyone?

    We will be trailing bulky waste collection for pensioners, concession card holders and people with a disability.

    If this goes well, Council will consider the business case for further expansion of this service.

    When will this be rolled out?

    The plan is to roll this out within the next two years.

    Why can you not offer this service to everyone straight away?

    Bulky collection is an expensive service and we need to ensure that we can service this need without adding additional costs to our waste services. In addition, our population is quite dispersed making the delivery of this service difficult. We had overwhelming support for this service so we are rolling it out to the people Council feels needs this service the most and may further expand the service in the future.

Questions from draft strategy public exhibition

    No mention of impact of Snowy 2.0 - opportunities, use of plant for tip sites and impact of workforce?

    The impacts from Snowy 2.0, at the time of writing, are considered to be minimal on Councils waste infrastructure and services and therefore are not required to be considered under the waste strategy.

    Population growth forecasts particularly for Jindabyne and Alpine Area SAP do not align with Mayor's current estimates.

    The strategy includes the .id population estimates as the waste strategy is being released prior to the SAP master plan cannot include the SAP estimate. A sensitivity analysis has been conducted using the SAP estimates and does not change the recommendations in the strategy.

    Bearing in mind costs associated with transport to and from Cooma to Canberra and Bombala would point to future use of proposed railway project to cut costs.

    The likelihood of a rail project to be realised in the strategies 10 year action plan is extremely low and therefore is not considered.

    Issue of tip charges for rural residents - disincentive for conforming to recycling and management of potential landfill.

    Council operates waste management facilities as a pay for service. If a service is to be subsidised by Council the revenue must be generated through other means. It is not recommended that waste destined for landfill be provided for free as this promotes waste to landfill which goes against the principles of the waste strategy. The fees and charges go on public exhibition every year prior close to the start of the financial year. If a resident believes any service or fee is worth Council subsidising through other revenue they should provide through this process. The waste strategy is not the appropriate process to directly recommend changes in fees and charges.

    Allocation of Bank of Banks (BOBs) in rural areas

    Full question submitted by resident:

    "The criteria for having BOBs is a minimum of six households signing up for it, but how does Council consider where they will be placed - how close to the residences need to be for them to be close enough for a BoB (noting that it is a rural area)? Are residents responsible for organising six households or does council do that in isolation once expressions of interest have been received?"


    Council investigates various potential locations for  BOBs to be installed. All areas are then assessed to gauge any necessary works to an area such as if concrete pads are required, potential distance to a bank of bins for residents. After Council has determined the relevant location for a proposed bank of bins, Council requests residents surrounding this location to complete a survey to determine the level of interest. Once this is received Council then determines if the service will go ahead.

    The number six is an approximate and not absolute. Prior to establishing the Bunyan BOB Council undertook a survey and received 22 responses. Of the responses 5 agreed to the service, while 17 said no to the service. The Bunyan is currently used by 15 residents.

    What infrastructure is needed for a bank of bins? A concrete slab, or just the metal structure? How is the metal structure secured, noting the extremely strong winds we get in this region?

    Infrastructure required varies from site to site. However, materials such as a concrete slab and/or gravel can be used to install the metal bank of the bins frame, ensuring that the area is clear of vegetation and so forth. The frame could potentially be secured to the concrete slab if required, however, the frame itself is quite heavy along with the four 360 litre bins the weight is quite substantial and can withhold against the extreme winds of this area. To date, Council has had no issues with climatic conditions affecting the BOBs already installed across the region.

    Who is responsible for the installation and maintenance of the infrastructure (be it a concrete slab or other)? Who cleans the bins to stop them attracting declared pest species animals (foxes, feral pigs etc.) and also to prevent maggots and smells?

    Council’s Resource and Waste department are responsible for maintaining all bank of bins cages and sites. If illegal dumping occurs the Public Health and Environment team investigate the matter and apply any infringements if evidence allows.

    Who is responsible for the maintenance and safety of the area surrounding the BOBs?

    The example provided by the resident:

    "Whipper snipping to discourage snakes and tidying of the area when there are accidental spills of rubbish or inappropriate dumping (communal bin areas always have this problem, and suffer from not being a single person’s responsibility- therefore nobodies responsibility)."

    Council’s Resource and Waste department are responsible for all bank of bins cages and sites

    Can the bins be on a Crown Road with an enclosure permit and a gate off the highway? E.g. Colyers Road runs through our property, which adjoins the Monaro Highway.

    When site investigations are undertaken locations are predominately Council maintained roads, Council would need to investigate Colyers Road for suitability and access for all residential applicants.

    If we were to express interest in having a BOB on "our" road, would we have veto or any other rights over the placement?

    Additional comments to accompany above question:

    "We wouldn’t want it to be too close to our residence, nor too close to the road where it would be visible to passing traffic on the Monaro Highway."

    The Resource and Waste staff determine the location after assessing each potential site. This is then incorporated into the survey that is posted to residents for their return. Within this survey, residents have the ability to voice if they find the location of the BOB suitable or unsuitable.

    Placement and maintenance of BOBs

    Question from a resident: "Apparently nobody is responsible for maintenance of our Crown Road except the residents. It is often difficult for us to get a grader in to maintain our road, with the result that after a year or so, or an extremely bad storm, the stretch from the highway to an appropriate bin location can be a bit degraded (but still quite passable by a passenger car). Would there be a risk of a BOBs on our road not being emptied if the road degraded and we were unable to get it rectified for several months? What communication/assistance would there be from Council about the condition of the road as it related to collection? We wouldn’t want to be cut off from collection without six months or so warning to allow time for rectification. We also wouldn’t be able to bear the cost of more frequent road maintenance than is currently the case."


    ANSWER:

    The bank of bins cannot be installed on a private road and must be installed on a road, that can be maintained by Council.

    What happens when new residents move in? How easy is it for them to sign up to the BoB? &/or if they don’t want to be part of it, and that reduces the number below 6 - what happens?

    The process for signing up for a bank of bins is relatively easy. The person who wishes to utilise the service must have the property owner complete the application form as the charge appears on the rates of the property.

    A one off-key deposit is required to be paid which gives access to the bank of bins. Should the key be returned to Council and the service no longer utilised the key deposit is refunded. More information can be found https://www.snowymonaro.nsw.gov.au/283/Bank-of-Bins

    Does the pilot of bulky rubbish collection to pensioners include pensioners in rural areas?

    Comments accompanying question " Have you considered an annual rural bulky waste collection where, through a booking arrangement and perhaps a small fee, council could facilitate a large skip bin (or similar) for the six households serviced by a BOBs to share, placed at the same location? This would be so much cheaper than running the transfer station but also go some way towards meeting the needs of rural ratepayers, who already miss out on a lot of other services."

    ANSWER: The strategy reviewed the option of a rural bulky collection. Details of this can be found on page 38 and 39 of the strategy. The final recommendation was for option c of the bulky waste collection service which is only available for pensioners and people with a disability.

    When was the quarry adjacent to the Jindabyne Landfill purchased?

    Resident question: "I have a recollection of the debate I a council meeting, maybe a Bombala meeting I attended, several years ago over the recommendation by the waste committee to purchase the quarry void adjacent to the Jindabyne landfill. Corbett and Ewart were the Councillors making the recommendation I recall."

    Council’s electronic records indicate that the site has been owned by Council since at least 1994. Ownership of the site prior to 1994 would need to be verified through a detailed search of Councils physical records.

    The follow-up questions are not relevant as the quarry has been owned by Council since at least 1994.

    Was this void space purchased?

    When was the purchase, if it was purchased?

    What was the purchase price?

    Who was the vendor?

    What would the present sale prospects be for the quarry void now that council proposes to close the Jindabyne landfill?

    Council has not considered the long term options for the land. Some land would need to be retained to provide adequate buffer distances for the landfill and sewage treatment plant. 

    Could you itemise the $ 52,977.00 cost of running Numeralla Transfer station.

    The operating cost in the strategy is the average of the 2018-2019 and 2019-2020 financial years. The breakdown of this average cost is:

    • Employment and job costs = 54%
    • Materials and contracts = 34% (includes waste transport and general maintenance)
    • Internal plant charges = 4%
    • Internal charges = 7% (internal waste disposal)
    • Other = 1% (insurance and printing costs etc.)

    Numeralla transfer station received 9 tons of garbage. Is this household waste only?

    Residents follow up question: 

    1. If yes, Then what quantity of household recycling was received as well?
    2. If no, then could you give the weights of the waste and the recycling in the 9 tons?
    3. Could you let us know all the weights and monetary figures for the previous year to the one used?

    ANSWER: Details of how much waste is received is available in Table 6 of the waste strategy on pages 15 and 16. Numeralla transfer station receives 26 tonnes of mixed waste (garbage) per year and 18 tonnes of commingled recycling per year. The data provided is a two-year average.


    Are the proposed garbage trucks capable of travelling on dirt roads?

    Council currently provides a collection service on several unsealed roads in the area. Prior to establishing a collection route on an unsealed road, Council will undertake an assessment. If the road owner is not managed by the Council permission must be sought from the road manager. The strategy does not include the investigation of specific roads. A proposed action item of the strategy is to undertake an assessment of the collection route and bank of bin network. A subsection of this assessment will likely include road suitability in line with the current process.

    How many of the 620 ratepayers properties are grazing or bush blocks/weekenders without houses?

    Council does not have sufficient detail to determine the requested information.

    How much is in the restricted waste management funds?

    This information can be found on page 35 of the Annual Financial Statements for the year ended 30 June 2020. At the end of the 2019-2020 financial year, there was $0 in the Domestic waste management funds and $7,274,000 in the Waste management fund.

    Jindabyne figures in the GHD & MRA report refer to 5700 tonnes of VENM inbound to JFL as ‘waste’ as a component part of the total of 14kT. Is this the correct classification, and should this not be better clarified?

    Virgin excavated natural material (VENM) is classified as a waste by the NSW EPA.

    Why can’t we see the greater detailed breakdown of total tonnages, say for Batteries, scrap metal, e-waste, problem wastes, mattresses, oils (food and Hydrocarbons), outbound dirt/concrete/rubble (if any) & tip shop sales?

    Council submits an annual waste return for the majority of Council’s waste facilities. The data in this provides the best breakdown of waste types and is validated by Council so provides the best accuracy of waste volumes. Please see attached WARRP Reports.

    Consideration of potential location and size of BoB’s

    Residents full question: "Can I also get a confirmation that the strategy has not contemplated, nor considered, the likely or potential locations nor size, intensity/disbursement or even the cyclical operation frequency of the BoB’s that might be required to replace the transfer Stations AND the attendant civil costs with these Bob construction sites?

    ANSWER: The strategy has not considered specific locations for Bank of Bins. A proposed action item from the strategy is to undertake a detailed assessment of possible locations. Council has received several requests for bank of bin locations through the consultation period which will be further investigated if approved. Council staff cannot undertake further investigation on the scale proposed in the strategy for suitable locations until the strategy is adopted.

    The cost modelling of the bank of bins utilised the real cost of installation of the previous Bank of Bin locations. From these costings, the civil and installation works were incorporated into the cost per cage. The bank of bin location assessment in the past has included a minimisation in the amount of civil works required, which is recommended to be carried through to future assessment of suitable locations.

    With respect to the proposed ‘East Cooma’ landfill: Is this the current Nimmitabel quarry, as it is near the end of its resource extraction limit and life?

    This option used Nimmitabel as the location of the landfill. The model used the town centre to determine the haulage distance.

    Is this land immediately to the east boundary of the current Cooma tip?

    No, a key assumption of this option was that the new site would be far enough from Cooma that Council has to operate both a transfer station in Cooma and the new landfill site.

    Did the former Cooma Council ever take out an option over the land to the immediate east of the current Cooma LF?

    The former Cooma-Monaro Shire Council has twice in the past considered the expansion of the landfill to the immediate east of the current site. Council has not been approved to expand the landfill to the east of the current site.

    Did the former council ever purchase the land adjacent to the current tip?

    Yes, the land east of the Cooma Landfill is owned by Council.

    Is the proposed future ‘Cooma east’ tip to be a council operation (ratepayer owned), or is it likely to be a private facility?

    The landfill in this option is a Council operated facility.

    So the last question, what is the current expenditure to-date on the development and carriage of this waste strategy? I’m guessing its already over $1 million and climbing?

    The total project cost will be consolidated once the project is complete.

    The contract value for the modelling and preparation of the strategy is approximately $120,000. Contract 13/3019 on Councils contract register includes the feasibility study for a possible Jindabyne Landfill expansion. This contract also includes a geotechnical investigation, site surveys, design of a new landfill cell, design of a new transfer station and designs for the closure of the current landfill cell. The feasibility study is only a small proportion of Contract 13/2019.